Social Security
Social Security

Absolutely top-notch. -- Record Publishing 

Playwright Andrew Bergamn wrote a humorous yet tender script.  Director Nancy Cates caught Bergman's style, and helped her cast (play) this comedy for laughs and warmth. 

Klein and Worswick are at the top of their comedic abilities.  Klein seems to play physical comedy more stylishly that we've seen it played in a long time.  Worswick tosses off jokes and naughtly punch lines with the grace of a pie in the face.

Sophie's character illustrates what good theatre is about: a change in character.  (She) is excellent as she lets her character grow.

The audience has a good time in the company of these six fine actors. -- West Side Leader


I Hate Hamlet
I Hate Hamlet

This strong cast is equally balanced, without a weak link.  This is Coach House at the peak of its powers, with a production that shouldn't be missed." -- West Side Leader

You haven’t really seen a man in tights till you’ve seen actor Daren Kelly playing the ghost of John Barrymore in Coach House Theatre’s I Hate Hamlet.  It’s a crazy-looking getup that the guest Equity artist carries off with aplomb.  (Joe) Pine does well as the insecure TV star who’s intimidated by the thought of taking on the role that made Barrymore an international sensation. He’s doing it in large part to impress his loopy girlfriend Deirdre, played with sweetness and humor by Tess Burgler.  Director Nancy Cates brings a delightfully light tone to this comedy. -- Akron Beacon Journal 

A good, long laugh has the power to lift the spirits and let us know we've had a good evening in the theatre.  Paul Rudnick's I Hate Hamlet fulfills the promise of comedy and laughter in Akron's Coach House Theatre." -- West Side Leader 

Kelly and Pine (are given) an opportunity to display their considerable talents.  Kelly has a strong voice that can melt to a whisper and still be heard in the back row.  Pine is capable of vocal gymnastics and of playing physical comedy.  Each is perfect for these demanding roles. -- West Side Leader



Move Over, Mrs. Markham
Move Over, Mrs. Markham

"Coach House Theatre has a big hit on its hands with the fabulously funny farce Move Over, Mrs. Markham, a rib-tickling delight from 1971." -- Akron Beacon Journal

"Audience members love being in on the joke and the laughs just keep rolling in this fine show, where there’s never a dull moment." -- ABJ

"Writers Ray Cooney and John Chapman almost killed the Coach House audience with laughter with their show “Move Over, Mrs. Markham.”  -- West Side Leader

Don’t worry and don’t be a prude, the excellent cast and director work with their playwrights to create a silly, memorable evening in the Coach House Theatre. -- WSL


A Moon for the Misbegotten
A Moon for the Misbegotten

A stellar Moon shines at Coach House: Humor and tragedy combine for a riveting performance. -- Hudson Hub-Times

Knox masterfully brings to life Josie's anger, defiance and rough tongue, all of which are ruses to cover up the character's deepest desires.

Longing, guilt and forgiveness take center stage in an emotionally charged production.  The verbal battles between Burgler and Knox as boisterour father and daughter are lively fun...(Dougfred Miller) rises to the occasion in the famously romantic third acti, the emotional climax of the show. -- Akron Beacon Journal


And Then There Were None
And Then There Were None

This production is an example of good writing, quality directing, and excellent action.  The admirable cast slowly boils each character's tensions to the surface and bubbles the threat of murder wuntil the cast and audience seem trapped together on Soldier Island.  This show has the charm aof the witty black-and-white movies  from the early 1940's. -- West Side Leader 

Classic murder mystery sure to delight! -- Akron Beacon Journal 

A treat to see for fans of the myster writer's work. -- Hudson Hub-Times


The Philadelphia Story
The Philadelphia Story

"The willowy Tess Burgler is lovely as socialite Tracy Lord...  Director Nancy Cates’ cast ushers us into an upper-crust world of charm, elegance and plenty of wisecracking. Joe Pine makes a notable turn as the debonair, mildly insulting Dexter. He and Burgler, who is his real-life love, make plenty of sparks fly onstage as this sparring former couple.  Henry Bishop is wonderfully lecherous as old Uncle Willie, who develops an infatuation for young photographer Liz Imbrie. Holly Humes plays this career girl with a nice balance of brassiness and wistfulness."  Akron Beacon Journal

"The cast is uniformly excellent.  Dede Kline (Margaret Lord), Richard Worswick (Seth Lord), Scott Shriner (Sandy Lord), Humes and Henry Bishop (Uncle Willie) are appropriately madcap in excellent supporting roles. This is a quality production. Some of the best actors in our area show the audience just how screwball they can be."  West Side Leader

"The resulting action is comic gold, especially in the hands of this cast. The comedy is crisp and clean, and there was plenty of laughter from the audience throughout."  Hudson Hub Times


Shipwrecked! an Entertainment, the Amazing Adventures of Louis de Rougement (as told by himself)
Shipwrecked! an Entertainment, the Amazing Adventures of Louis de Rougement (as told by himself)

"Coach House Theatre opened its 2011-12 season with a sizzling blockbuster...  “Shipwrecked!” is an excellent production of a superior script."  West Side Leader

"The power of the imagination is a wonderful thing at Coach House Theatre’s Shipwrecked! An Entertainment – The Amazing Adventures of Louis de Rougemont (As Told by Himself).  It’s a wonderful little piece for a small ensemble that will delight audiences of many ages."  Akron Beacon Journal


Sleuth
Sleuth

"Coach House Theatre’s thriller Sleuth is a captivating battle of wit, intellect and will between characters whom expert actors Terry Burgler and Andrew Cruse make thoroughly memorable.

Equity actors and close colleagues Cruse and Burgler spar as wonderfully as they did in the comedy thriller Deathtrap last year, which also had plenty of twists and turns. Directed by Nancy Cates in both shows, the actors know how to perfectly pace numerous moments of table-turning." -- Akron Beacon Journal

"Extremely well-acted and directed...  The burden for the actors in “Sleuth” is immense... it is dialogue-driven as the two men face off in one emotional contest after another. Burgler as Andrew Wyke and Cruse as Milo are superbly up to the task. They fire dialogue at each other like hailstones, and in the energy of it all create a fast-paced narrative. Their handling of several accents shows their amazing versatility as actors." -- West Side Leader


Lettice and Lovage
Lettice and Lovage

"When Patterson and McGarvey get together on the stage, it’s pure theatrical magic." West Side Leader

“Lettice and Lovage” is one of the most pleasant evenings anyone could spend in the theater."

“March Madness” has come to Coach House Theatre. “Lettice and Lovage” opened March 24, and is as delightfully mad as anything ever presented at the theater."

"I’ve not heard that much laughter at Coach House since I started reviewing plays."


The Unexpected Guest
The Unexpected Guest

"This year’s production is indeed an exceptional one... the cast is uniformly excellent." West Side Leader

"'The Unexpected Guest’ is enjoyable company" Akron Beacon Journal


Present Laughter
Present Laughter

"This production has so much going for it that it’s difficult to know where to start...  A book could be written about this cast.  Cates has created a winning team, and the audience gets the prize. Please don’t miss this funny, charming production... This is quite a holiday present." 

David Ritchey, West Side Leader

"Fabulous flamboyance appears to come easily for (Daren) Kelly in this comedy, which pokes fun at actors who are full of themselves and well as the theatre business in general.  Kelly's comedic timing couldn't be more perfect... watching Kelly's comedic expertise on the Coach House stage is a treat for the holidays."

Kerry Clawson, Akron Beacon Journal

"Many laughs in Present Laughter."

April Helms, Record Publishing


The Gin Game
The Gin Game

"Theatre, actors deliver strong Gin Game"

Record Publishing

"Funny, with big laughs, and tragic, with heart-breaking moments."

West Side Leader

"The opening night audience seemed entranced by the production.  The audience members gasped when a significant bit of information was revealed for the first time.  Some were wiping a tear away as the production moved into its final chapter."

West Side Leader

The subject matter in The Gin Game is timeless, including issues of old age, pride and being continually drawn to someone who is abusive.  McGarvey and Figge so masterfully create this world of escalating geriatric combat, at one point, you get the feeling that their characters enjoy the fighting because it makes them feel alive."

Akron Beacon Journal

"Both shine as exceptionally talented performers who have the ability to move the audience to gasps and tears."

West Side Leader

"Figge creates a fascinating portrait of an old man lashing out in fear."
Akron Beacon Journal

The Gin Game should be required viewing for the oldest on the family tree, and those on the lower branches... (a) powerful production.
West Side Leader


Leading Ladies
Leading Ladies

"Coach House audiences love being in on the joke with Ken Ludwig's far-fetched fun in Leading Ladies.  How could you not laugh out loud watching a male character attempt to seduce a huge ''woman' in a ridiculously ugly dress and wig, when we know that 'woman' is really a man in drag?

Images of Leo dressed as an insane Cleopatra and Stephanie walking in a dress as if her feet are bound are emblazoned on my brain, as are their ludicrous wigs.

Actor Scott Shriner...has thoroughly earned his stripes now as a leading man.  (Jonathan) Fletcher also is delightful as the put-upon friend."

Kerry Clawson, Akron Beacon Journal


DOUBT, a Parable
DOUBT, a Parable

"The exquisite script gives the cast and the director opportunities to explore their own talents and skills.

This production merits the readers’ attention... This was a night of ethical and moral decisions. This is what good theater is all about.

Don’t skip this production because you saw the movie. You haven’t seen 'Doubt' until you’ve seen the Coach House production." 

David Ritchey, West Side Leader


Witness for the Prosecution
Witness for the Prosecution

"Coach House Theatre continues its two-decade tradition of presenting annual Christie mysteries with Witness for the Prosecution, which keeps audiences guessing the whole way through with its fine leading cast.

Actor Jeremy Jenkins brings a charmingly funny naivete to young Leonard... leading lady Tess Burgler continues to shine, this time as the ice princess Romaine."

Kerry Clawson, Akron Beacon Journal


You Can't Take It With You
You Can't Take It With You


"Coach House Theatre has a delightful hit on its stage with the production of 'You Can't Take It With You.'"
- David Ritchey, The West Side Leader

"...the old-fashioned comedy's heart manages to shine through at Coach House Theatre"
- Kerry Clawson, Akron Beacon Journal

"The cast does a commendable job not only bringing out the laughs in this story, but its heart as well."
- April Helms, Hudson Hub-Times

"This is a wonderful, sentimental, sweet production. 'You Can’t Take It With You' ...works well in 2009. I urge readers to call for tickets and have a pleasant evening in the theater."
-David Ritchey, West Side Leader

 
 
 

Deathtrap
Deathtrap

'Deathtrap’ brings thrills, chills to Coach House

Coach House Theatre has mounted a superior production of “Deathtrap” that has the power to frighten, thrill and chill the most jaded theater-goers.  Director Nancy Cates does a beautiful job with her cast. The action flows and ebbs like the ocean, with some big waves and action jolting the cast and the audience.  Cates has built an ensemble company. The cast shares the stage, the laughs, the thrills and the chills.
- David Ritchey, West Side Leader

Starring in the show are Equity actors Terry Burgler and Andrew Cruse, who play off each other so well, the rivalry and distrust that grows between their characters, Sidney Bruhl and Clifford Anderson, is both comical and suspenseful.  It's great fun watching the two lead characters repeatedly turn the tables on each other.
- Kerry Clawson, Akron Beacon Journal


Not Now, Darling
Not Now, Darling

"A laugh-out-loud comedy. Clever writing and sharp comedic action keep this one bouncing along." - Kerry Clawson, Akron Beacon Journal"

Farce isn't always easy to pull off on the stage, but the players in Coach House Theatre's production make it look easy." - David Ritchey, West Side Leader


Tonight at 8:30
Tonight at 8:30

"Wistfully romantic... lovely." - Kerry Clawson, Akron Beacon Journal


Light Up the Sky
Light Up the Sky

"This comedy lights up Coach House." - April Helms, Record Publishing


Steel Magnolias
Steel Magnolias

"(Director) Nancy Cates and the cast have developed an excellent ensemble that will be talked about throughout the season... This is a special production." - David Ritchey, West Side Leader